20190616 PLAN MASSE

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/19056_MANUFAKTU

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

O:\03_concours\92_Manufakture\03_etudes\01_acad\MAN_190618_AXONO

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/19056_MANUFAKTU

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/19056_MANUFAKTU

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/19056_MANUFAKTU

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

location : Brussels client : Abattoir NV program : food ateliers / swimming / parking/ pool size: 25.000 m2 project : 2019 phase : invitational competition design in collaboration with studio Muoto A LAYERED URBAN SYSTEM The Abattoir site has been playing a pivotal role for years in the debate around the urban development of the plan canal. It is considered as one of the potentially most important public spaces along the canal and it has been subject of several urban studies. The site presents an internal logic based on a complex historical logistics development which is nowadays very difficult to read, with the exception of the existing Hall. Our first intention was to unveil and possibly link this internal logic with the neighbourhood and the Canal system. We identified three urban structures: the Canal, the axis of Rue Heyvaert and the Sennette path. Exploring the relations between Manufakture and these urban structures has led to a project that aims to answer at several level to the needs of the city, of the neighbourhood and the building. A STRUCTURAL ORDER With its stepped profile, the building evokes the identity of the big exhibition hall and the presence of the ancient monuments, like Mastabas or Ziggurat. It expresses the stratification of different programs. The food ateliers on the ground floor are topped by a technical and service floor. The upper parking levels are set back to smooth the presence of the long façade and create a generous urban terrace. The last volume hosting the pool, forms the last step and is materialised with a light steel and glass structure. This superimposition of double and single heights forms a very flexible yet peculiar structure offering almost infinite programmatic reconfigurations. The structure is conceived to be highly adaptable and the parking floor, build using dry construction technique, is completely demountable without having to demolish part of it nor generating material waste.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/15024_CIRCULAR

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/15024_CIRCULAR

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/15024_CIRCULAR

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

Renovation and re-programming of prefab student housing modules location : Brussels, BE | status : realized | in collaboration with TRANSFORM (VUB) The Circular Retrofit Lab concerns the transformation of 8 students rooms in the middle of the green campus of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB). Today, the university campus is undergoing a transformation with several new buildings, in order to respond to growing numbers of students and to replace the existing student rooms. Consequently, the university initiated an exploration into how repurposing the existing student rooms can complement a sustainable development of its campus. The housing units, designed by Van Der Meeren, are made by prefabricated concrete modules, and compatible infill components for exterior and interior walls. Each 96m2 unit (4 modules) consist of 4 student rooms, a common living space and kitchen, and 2 bathrooms. Together with the TRANSFORM research team (VUB) we will investigate and demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste when refurbishing existing buildings. Therefore 3 renovation strategies are considered for the re-design of these modules: the internal transformation, the external transformation and the spatial transformation of the modules. At the building system and material level, the Circular Retrofit Lab aims to demonstrate how Reversible Building Design can prevent demolition waste and consumption of virgin resources while undergoing those adaptations in the future. The overall objective of the Circular Retrofit Lab is to explore and implement pathways towards a circular economy in the building sector by integrating the concepts of reversible building design and material passports.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/16037_ASPER/2_O

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/16037_ASPER/2_O

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/16037_ASPER/2_O

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/KADERSTUDIO projects/16037_ASPER/2_O

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

Design of a family house location : Affligem, BE | status : construction | surface : 450m2 Overlooking the Dender valley this family house is situated on a sloping terrain near the village of Affligem. While the garage and some technical rooms are carved out in the terrain, the house stands on top of the slope as a lightweight volume supported by walls. The very transparent, structure-free ground floor seamlessly ensures the view to the valley and to the garden. The first floor, comprised by concrete floor slabs, presents a more closed façade composed by an alternating rhythm of openable and fixed wooden panels. Designed for life-long living the structure of the house has been reduced to its bare minimum: two cantilevering floor slabs are hold up by two concrete sidewalls and a central core. The result is an open plan that can evolve from a single-family house to a multi-family house without drastically compromising its expression.

Design of a family house location : Affligem, BE | status : construction | surface : 450m2 Overlooking the Dender valley this family house is situated on a sloping terrain near the village of Affligem. While the garage and some technical rooms are carved out in the terrain, the house stands on top of the slope as a lightweight volume supported by walls. The very transparent, structure-free ground floor seamlessly ensures the view to the valley and to the garden. The first floor, comprised by concrete floor slabs, presents a more closed façade composed by an alternating rhythm of openable and fixed wooden panels. Designed for life-long living the structure of the house has been reduced to its bare minimum: two cantilevering floor slabs are hold up by two concrete sidewalls and a central core. The result is an open plan that can evolve from a single-family house to a multi-family house without drastically compromising its expression.

Design of a family house location : Affligem, BE | status : construction | surface : 450m2 Overlooking the Dender valley this family house is situated on a sloping terrain near the village of Affligem. While the garage and some technical rooms are carved out in the terrain, the house stands on top of the slope as a lightweight volume supported by walls. The very transparent, structure-free ground floor seamlessly ensures the view to the valley and to the garden. The first floor, comprised by concrete floor slabs, presents a more closed façade composed by an alternating rhythm of openable and fixed wooden panels. Designed for life-long living the structure of the house has been reduced to its bare minimum: two cantilevering floor slabs are hold up by two concrete sidewalls and a central core. The result is an open plan that can evolve from a single-family house to a multi-family house without drastically compromising its expression.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

design of a single family house location : Gavere, BE | status : realized | surface : 230m2 Operating in a territory whose character has been drastically altered by a mere parcellation logic, with the only scope of creating space for single family houses development, requires a twofold approach. On the one hand providing a generous and qualitative space for the dwellers and on the other one considering the quality of unbuilt space as even important to preserve the rural essence of the area. The perception of the farmland behind the house is guaranteed by literally organizing the plot in functional strips of different widths perpendicular to the street. Altering the parcelling regulations, all the built volumes are then consequently positioned on a 7 meter wide strip and alternated by green volumes (formed by trees) minimising the length and the impact of the façade along the street. The house itself is constituted by two independent elements: an external structure formed by a double height brick wall and 6 concrete columns supporting a pitched roof and an internal wooden skeleton that provides the actual inhabitable spaces of the house. The very generous porch originated by the different widths of the two structures provides a space in between inside and outside that can be eventually closed to form a winter garden and enjoyed during mid seasons. The independency of the external and internal structure assures a long-term adaptability of the plan letting its program extend, shrink, change or perhaps revert back to agricultural functions.

/Users/stijnelsen/Documents/OneDrive/KADERSTUDIO/17043_PAARDENMA

Renovation and expansion of the Paardenmarkt site for the Faculty Product Design location : Antwerp, BE | status : competition design | in collaboration with Braaksma & Roos Architecten Our project for the urban re-qualification of the Paardenmarkt campus and the new faculty of Product Design of the university of Antwerp investigates the role and the interactions that educational facilities can establish with the city and within historical buildings especially. The Paardenmarkt campus lies next to the main city campus, real core of the university. Despite its prestigious location the urban block has historically developed without real urban coherence and presents today a certainly underused potential that lies in its generously open and unbuilt spaces. After a thorough analysis of the existing city campus, we extrapolated a series of “urban tools” (such as gatehouses, canopies, green squares, etc.) which according to our view are nowadays defining its urban qualities. It is by reinterpret and apply this urban tools that the new campus can become integral part of the neighbouring university facilities. The new faculty of product design plays a pivotal role for the activation of the Paardenmarkt campus and it will be hosted in a group of neighbouring historical buildings. To maintain their character as much as possible and to optimize their spatial use we foresee a clear and ingenious circulation system. By grouping the vertical and horizontal circulation outmost outside the existing buildings, we propose a building complex where new and existing are complementary and originates a very flexible system that can host a multifunctional program. The expression of this newly added circulation system forms a subtle dialogue with the existing buildings and becomes symbol of the re-activation of the courtyard through the new faculty.

Renovation and expansion of the Paardenmarkt site for the Faculty Product Design location : Antwerp, BE | status : competition design | in collaboration with Braaksma & Roos Architecten Our project for the urban re-qualification of the Paardenmarkt campus and the new faculty of Product Design of the university of Antwerp investigates the role and the interactions that educational facilities can establish with the city and within historical buildings especially. The Paardenmarkt campus lies next to the main city campus, real core of the university. Despite its prestigious location the urban block has historically developed without real urban coherence and presents today a certainly underused potential that lies in its generously open and unbuilt spaces. After a thorough analysis of the existing city campus, we extrapolated a series of “urban tools” (such as gatehouses, canopies, green squares, etc.) which according to our view are nowadays defining its urban qualities. It is by reinterpret and apply this urban tools that the new campus can become integral part of the neighbouring university facilities. The new faculty of product design plays a pivotal role for the activation of the Paardenmarkt campus and it will be hosted in a group of neighbouring historical buildings. To maintain their character as much as possible and to optimize their spatial use we foresee a clear and ingenious circulation system. By grouping the vertical and horizontal circulation outmost outside the existing buildings, we propose a building complex where new and existing are complementary and originates a very flexible system that can host a multifunctional program. The expression of this newly added circulation system forms a subtle dialogue with the existing buildings and becomes symbol of the re-activation of the courtyard through the new faculty.

Modelo

Renovation and expansion of the Paardenmarkt site for the Faculty Product Design location : Antwerp, BE | status : competition design | in collaboration with Braaksma & Roos Architecten Our project for the urban re-qualification of the Paardenmarkt campus and the new faculty of Product Design of the university of Antwerp investigates the role and the interactions that educational facilities can establish with the city and within historical buildings especially. The Paardenmarkt campus lies next to the main city campus, real core of the university. Despite its prestigious location the urban block has historically developed without real urban coherence and presents today a certainly underused potential that lies in its generously open and unbuilt spaces. After a thorough analysis of the existing city campus, we extrapolated a series of “urban tools” (such as gatehouses, canopies, green squares, etc.) which according to our view are nowadays defining its urban qualities. It is by reinterpret and apply this urban tools that the new campus can become integral part of the neighbouring university facilities. The new faculty of product design plays a pivotal role for the activation of the Paardenmarkt campus and it will be hosted in a group of neighbouring historical buildings. To maintain their character as much as possible and to optimize their spatial use we foresee a clear and ingenious circulation system. By grouping the vertical and horizontal circulation outmost outside the existing buildings, we propose a building complex where new and existing are complementary and originates a very flexible system that can host a multifunctional program. The expression of this newly added circulation system forms a subtle dialogue with the existing buildings and becomes symbol of the re-activation of the courtyard through the new faculty.


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